The Ace is Dealing

If you can’t find Josh Burgmann at the ballpark, check the casinos because he is dealing this season.

The 6-foot tall, 205-pound sophomore pitcher from British Columbia has put together a stellar campaign thus far for the University of Washington Huskies of the Pac-12 Conference.

Over seven starts, the righthander has hurled 46.2 innings, racked up 59 strikeouts, picked up three wins and posted an earned-run average of just 1.54. Not a bad stat line for the graduate of the Vauxhall Academy of Baseball, who recently recorded a career-high 13 strikeouts against Oregon State.

Burgmann was kind enough to make time for Alberta Dugout Stories recently.

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Framing Up in Florida

Ayden Makarus wanted to be a goalie in hockey.

But his father made him a deal that if he played baseball, he could be a catcher.

Now the Airdrie, Alberta native is taking his game to a whole new level with Baseball Canada’s Junior National Team at Spring Training in Florida.

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Trap Game

Edmonton baseball fans have long hoped for a return of the Trappers to RE/MAX Field and now they finally have it.

No, not those Trappers – not the Triple-A team of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) that served as a stepping stone for aspiring major leaguers from 1981 through 2004. 

The Edmonton Collegiate Trappers, an expansion franchise in the Canadian College Baseball Conference (CCBC), are making their league debut this season and head coach Ethan Elias couldn’t be more excited about bringing a new form of spring baseball to the provincial capital.

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The Baseball Brat

There is a little confusion over where T.J. Bennett is really from.

As it turns out, he was born in Lethbridge but didn’t spend a whole lot of time here.

The reason: his father was a baseball coach for a new Pioneer League team in 1992. That background gave us context on how the 26-year-old has lived his baseball life.

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Tokyo Fan Club

It was a contingent of Hall-of-Fame baseball talent that Western Canada had never seen before and hasn’t seen since.

When Major League Baseball (MLB) stars descended upon Alberta in October of 1934 on their way to Vancouver to board a ship for Japan, the group of legendary players included Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Lefty Gomez, and Moe Berg.

The only thing more compelling than the celebrity aura they brought to each stop was the newspaper ink they generated on their 19-game barnstorming tour of North America, which included 12 contests in Canada, in the lead up to their Asian tour.

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